Main Forum

Important Scoring/Judging System

3 replies
cy_ tag
Master of Sketch
Posts:
525
Bunnies:
+620
Please post at least two or more pieces of your best artwork into your rankup post. This'll help us judge your work better by comparing them. Feel free to add sketches as well to show your progress/learning (not completed pieces). Those will count towards effort/creativity points.

With this revamped version, it only requires at least two of the arbiters to be present to judge, then we calculate the average of both totals and place you in your respective rank. This is to ensure fairness and non-biased opinions.

Things we look for/score:

Colour/Shading (10 pts)
(if applicable)
- How the colours tie together strengthen the impact of the artwork (balance, really)
(if not applicable)
- Understanding of value - light source/shadows wrapping around an object.
Colour is not compulsory here. If you want to do greyscale, you're free to do so - but the same instances still apply with light/shadow.

Stroke Strength (5 pts)
- With lineart: fluidity, pixelation, cleanliness/intent, how well it suits the drawing as a whole (you can get away with a messy lineart, but it has to look intentional)
- No lineart: Edges, pixelation, shape - do it with purpose, not for the sake of getting strokes down.
- Use of shapes - how clear they are.

Body/Object Structure (5 pts)
- Since not everyone draws humans, it’s moreso on the strength of the shape of the character/object (stroke strength is tied into this) - how 3D it is, how the objects behave in relation to each other on a physical platform, etc.
- If humans are drawn, we'll judge based on the cohesiveness of their anatomy based on the person's drawing style - proportion of limbs/facial features placement/angle at which the body is drawn

Pose (5 pts)
- Deviate from just a regular standing pose - make it interesting!

Creativity (5 pts)
- Do something that is different from just drawing a character as is - are you telling a story? What setting/situation is your character in? etc.
- Draw backgrounds and set up the camera angle to tell us something.

Bonus Points
Bonus points include (but are not limited to) the things mentioned below. They’re also not based on the scale scoring system, so could be advantageous in moving up the ranks.
Arbiters are free to add points for things that stand out to them as well, so this category is a tad of a wild card, but it does help in the long run. This category is what places people into Master Class above Class A.
E.g. If you were just barely on the last point of a rank, this could help you get an extra boost.
background - trees, mountains, landscape in general, buildings
- Compositional elements - placing the character in a setting/position constrained within the size of the canvas
- How well the character is placed in the environment - this gets a bit touchy feely on how this contributes to the overall feel of the work

Points Scoring System (this is subject to change):
Master30+
Class A26-30 (5 pts)
Class B21-25 (5 pts)
Class C16-20 (5 pts)
Class D11-15 (5 pts)
Class E4-10 (7 pts)
If it's just a lineart traditional drawing, we can't add the colouring point into consideration unless you try to shade it (either render/cross hatch), hence the 4 points. 5 is the usual minimum amount of points we can give.

If you wish to know the details of your class arrangement, please PM one of the arbiters. The scoreboard will make a lot more sense then :p
Here's my two cents and a wall of text to go with it :3
Posted Sep 20, 15 · OP · Last edited Aug 27, 16
Bunneh
x 24
x 24
List
Undo
cy_ tag
Master of Sketch
Posts:
525
Bunnies:
+620
Right, here's a list of what we really look for:

  • No Headshots - the more there are, the less points you get. We're looking for full body drawings - both genders, different body types, drawn from different camera angles, characters interacting with each other/environment, different facial expressions. Dynamism is a super bonus when characters aren't stiff (they have spines, ya know).
    Course, it's not like headshots aren't allowed completely. But you have to make them pretty darn good for us to accept that. It's just that it doesn't properly show your full capability if that's all you can do.
  • Do NOT avoid hands & feet. Seriously. And add ears. Don't forget that your character has a brain either. The reason why ears are important is because they align with the jawline, and the character's noggin shows up behind it. For all of you going anime influenced whatever route - you keep forgetting this -.-
  • Once you get past that part - composition/storytelling. Where is the character standing in the image? Why? What kind of feeling do you want to get out of the illustration rather than have them just standing there? What's their backstory?
  • Keep your characters' limb lengths consistent. All drawings are based on the human body because that's the thing we see the most in our lives. Measure the limbs if you have to with lines.
  • Backgrounds. Goes without saying. There's a severe lack of them in Usagi right now. Draw buildings, landscapes, mountains, the sea, underwater, etc. Possibilities are endless!
  • Don't just draw humans - do animals, transport, etc.
  • Stop using only centered compositions. It's boring and doesn't showcase your skills well. The only time you can get away with this is if you make the subject matter of the drawing compelling enough, not just a flat shot standing there with arms by their sides.
  • Perspective - camera angle shot change, essentially. Makes the drawings more dynamic looking and solidifies the ground upon which the characters are standing on. I'd suggest practicing one/two/three point perspective drawings and drawing boxes. I repeat - drawing boxes.
  • Lighting - get a light source if any - just draw a circle to represent a light bulb/little sun and draw arrows going down to indicate the directions. This is mostly to establish the volume of the figure so it doesn't look flat 2D. Consider the lighting properly when doing the shadow of whatever object you've drawn as well.
  • USE REFERENCES. I cannot stress this enough. If you don't know how to do something - get reference. It's not cheating. It gets your work done better and faster if you're doing something against something that already exists and is easier to visually compare than to draw from your imagination. The more references you use at the start, the less you'll end up finding later on because by then you'd have ingrained everything you actively learned into your art.

Think of this like the 10 commandments or something lol
The actual scoring takes all of this into account, minus stroke strength because that's pretty self explanatory - just try and get stuff in one stroke. This comes with practice and repetition.

Usagi can only help you get so far. It's up to you as the artist to push yourself to improve. All we can do is provide points as to what you're doing wrong. Look up stuff yourself as well instead of just asking.

Good luck~
Here's my two cents and a wall of text to go with it :3
Posted Apr 23, 16 · OP · Last edited Jun 5, 16
Bunneh
x 11
x 11
List
Undo
Posts:
227
Bunnies:
+158

  • Follow the form of your piece - Whether you're painting, crosshatching, or doing lineart, always keep in mind how your object works in 3D space. Instead of painting or crosshatching flatly up and down, try to consider its curves and its actual form of the thing you're drawing.
For example:
Spoiler: image o3oShow
The artist in this case specifically outlines and adds lines around the hand to emphasize its slight curves and bends that make up the muscles and flesh of the hand. You can clearly see how it works in space and it doesn't look awkward nor 2 dimensional. Even if you erased the actual lines wrapping around the hand leaving only the outline, it still looks justified, and that's what you should aim for with your drawings.
2mnkdwk.jpg
yoJC2HeHjYp6VsA3XG.gif
Posted May 11, 16
Bunneh
x 3
x 3
List
Undo
Posts:
227
Bunnies:
+158
Recommended resources:


Colour/Shading:

Body/Object structure

Pose


Other tips
  • "Okay, I watched all the videos and read all the books but I still suck."
    Just watching/reading all the things won't get you anywhere. You have to put pencil to paper, brush to canvas and get that milage out in order to actually improve. Resources, references, and youtube videos point you in the direction in what to actually practice. It's up to you to do it! ^^
  • Get out of your comfort zone. One of the best ways to improve is drawing what you can’t draw.
  • Your drawing/painting looks bad? Analyze what you might think looks wrong. Get a new perspective by dropping it by the discord chat, asking a friend/family, mirroring the image, or waiting a day to look at it again.


Artbooks!!
2mnkdwk.jpg
yoJC2HeHjYp6VsA3XG.gif
Posted Jun 21, 17 · Last edited Jun 28, 17
Bunneh
x 2
x 2
List
Undo
NoticeNotices